National Geographic

My Eagle Spread

Baddeck, Nova Scotia is a wonderful and unique place. Two amazing things happened to me in Baddeck. First, I met and got to spend nearly 30 minutes talking to Gil Grosvenor, former head of National Geographic (and descendant of Alexander Graham Bell). We talked about Nat Geo, horses, maps, but mostly we talked about people. And about how empowering people and believing in people can lead to wonderful things. He told me a wonderful story about Jane Goodall that I'll share in the future.

The second amazing thing was out in Bras d'Or Lake on Cape Breton Island. We were on a small sailboat cruising around when a couple of Bald Eagles put on a show for us. Enjoy. (click on any image to view in a lightbox)

Bald eagles can have up to a 7ft wing span and weigh up to 15lbs. 

Eagles choose a life mate after they are about 5 years old, and then can live to be 20 years old.

Bald eagles are found throughout North America, mostly near bodies of water.

Eagles can use thermal currents to climb to 10,000ft in the sky. When they dive to make a kill they can reach speeds of 100mph.

Eagles prefer to eat fish, but have been known to eat other waterfowl (mostly ducks), muskrats, and even turtles.

The oldest bald eagle in captivity survived to be 48 years old.

In 2007, Bald Eagles were taken off the endangered species list. However conservation efforts cannot stop. As people move to shoreland areas, cutting down trees can severely impact their habitat.

Eagle imagery was often used in the Roman Republic which led to the founding fathers of the United States of America adopting the Bald Eagle as our national symbol June 20, 1782.

And here is me and Gil after one of the most impactful conversations I've ever had.